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Mayfly

The Mayfly is a member of the Ephemera family, there are three mayflies commonly found in the British Isles, these are Ephemera danica, Ephemera vulgata & Ephemera lineata, for the purposes of this email we are treating them all as one (as the differences as negligible). Mayflies can be found in both still running water, but the majority are found on our rivers, it does not seem to matter the strength of the flow. Mayflies are found throughout the British Isles in all types of river and stream. They are easily identified in May and June as they will be the biggest up-winged fly on the water and white in colour. Mayflies can range quite considerably in size, from 15 to 25mm long (usually a size 14...

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Olive Upright

The Olive Upright (Rhithrogena semicolorata) is a member of the Heptageniidae family, a family of mayflies with over 500 described species. These flies are generally rather small with two long tails. The wings are usually clear with a blue-grey tinge to them. We will learn more about the Heptageniidae family through the season, as they make up the majority of flies the angler is predominantly interested in. The Olive Upright is a very close relative of the March Brown. Where To Find Them Olive Uprights are more commonly found on the larger rocky rivers in the north and south-west of England; throughout Scotland, Wales and Ireland. Olive Uprights seem to prefer rocky or stony river beds with faster flowing water. When To Find Them The Olive Upright...

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Large Brook Dun

The Large Brook Dun (Ecdyonurus torrentis) is a member of the Heptageniidae family. The Heptageniidae are a family of mayflies with over 500 described species. These flies are generally rather small with two long tails. The wings usually have a dark marbling and are sometimes banded with lighter patches. We will learn more about the Heptageniidae family through the season, as they make up the majority of flies the angler is predominantly interested in. The Large Brook Dun is a distinctive mayfly with a brown body and wings which appear slightly marbled brown and white. Where To Find Them Large Brook Duns are found in the more upland parts of the UK. The nymphs like rocky, boulder-strewn rivers. Their preferred habitats are acidic rivers flowing over bedrock and boulders because their nymphs live under stones, not...

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Alder Fly

The Alder fly is a member of the Sialidae family. It is a large, sluggish insect often found on vegetation near to both running and still water. Its larvae are aquatic carnivores that live in the silt at the bottom of ponds and slow-flowing rivers. Adults are seen in early summer (April in the South of the UK and early May in the more northern parts). They emerge in vast numbers and live for just a couple of days in order to mate. The females lay their eggs on overhanging vegetation. The larvae hatch and drop into the water where they develop over one or two years. The Alder can be identified by its black veined wings, which fold up like a tent over its back.Please Note: You will often see these flies...

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Hawthorn Fly

The Hawthorn fly (Bibio Marci) is one of the first flies of the season known as 'Terrestrials', these are flies which do not originate from the river, but do end up on it as food for Trout. The Hawthorn Fly is sometimes known around the country as The St. Mark’s Fly, because they emerge around St Mark’s Day (25th April) every year. This fly belongs to the Family Bibionidae and there are around 20 different species found throughout the UK. Where To Find Them Hawthorn flies are found in every part of the British Isles, especially prolific in England, Wales and Ireland. Scotland does have prolific hatches of Heather flies (Bibio pomonae) which are very similar to Hawthorn flies and are discussed below. Hawthorn flies are...

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